Pre-modern Korea: Society and Culture
Credits: 4
Course Lecturer: Dr. Jooyeon Rhee

This course examines politics, society, and culture of pre-modern Korea: from pre-historic times to the turn of the twentieth-century. It offers a general, and yet solid overview of Korean history in the East Asian context. Readings cover various aspects of Korean civilization such as politics and policies, intellectual history, cultural developments (literature and fine arts), religious practices, gender relations/roles, folk culture, international relations, etc.


Introduction to Modern Korea
Credits: 2
Course Lecturer: Dr. Alon Levkowitz

In this course we will study the development of Modern Korea since the end of the Choson dynasty until today. The course we will examine various aspects of Korean society, politics and culture. This couse aims are to let the students understand the history of Korea and its influence on Korea’s policies, and understand the complexity of the crisis in the Korean Peninsula.


Forum of Asia in International Arena – Politics, Economy and Institutions
Credits: None, a montly class for International Relations-Asia students.
Course Lecturer: Ira Lyan

In recent decades, Asia has retaken its central position in world’s affairs, not only in the global economy but also in the realms of politics and culture. China, Japan and South Korea in East Asia, and India in South Asia, have become key players in the international arena and influence the lives of many people across the world.  Addressing the need for a better understanding of Asian countries’ politics, economy, and culture, this course combines the study of diplomatic history, international security, political economy, and international law with the language, history and culture of China, Japan, India, and Korea.


Understanding North Korea
Credits: 2
Course Lecturer: Dr. Jooyeon Rhee

This course examines North Korean politics, society, and culture by examining major historical events and developments since the country’s formation in 1948. It provides the historical circumstances in which North Korea came to exist, and explores how it has developed relationships with the rest of the world. Readings cover North Korea’s political history, social history, foreign policies, cultural policies, education, and gender relations; South Korea and the US’s policies on North Korea; and issues of human rights and refugees. Besides readings on politics and society, this course also covers literary and film texts that will deepen the understanding of the social and cultural lives of North Koreans.


Popular Culture in South Korea
Credits: 2
Course Lecturer: Ira Lyan

This introductory course on Korean popular culture aims to provide a comprehensive view of contemporary Korean society, politics, and economy through examining some of the most representative forms of popular culture. It investigates the ways in which contemporary Korean popular media such as film, TV-drama, social media, and popular music convey everyday Korean life; and explains how these forms of culture are co-related to a rapidly changing global environment. This course also provides theoretical concepts and ideas that enable students to understand Korean popular culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. Some of the crucial issues students will deal with include the trans-cultural significance of the Korean wave (Hallyu), race and ethnic relations, gender and sexuality, and nationalism.


Korean Economic Miracle
Credits: 2
Course Lecturer: Ira Lyan

South Korea’s economic performance during the last six decades has been described as a miracle and serves today as a role model for developing countries. This course is designed to find the answers to question what made this miracle happen analyzing Korean economic development and its opportunities and challenges. We will focus on topics such as the effect Korean political and economic system has on trade and foreign investment, the impact of social and cultural systems on management and business practices as well as the causes of economic slowdown and the financial crisis. Students will also study about chaebols’ strategies, such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG and some key Korean industries that fuel the national, regional and world economy.


North and South Korea: System, Society and Economy 
Credits: 4
Course Lecturer: Dr. Yaakov Cohen

The course is designed for students in the Department of Asian Studies, as well as those of political science, international relations, economics, business administration, sociology, law, modern history, geography and general studies. The course focuses on the changes in South and North Korea in the fields of government, economy, society and foreign relations during the 1990’s and to the present day. The course provides students with basic understanding of the main trends in the fields of government, economy, society and foreign relations of South and North Korea.


Korean For Beginers – Part A
Credits: 8
Teacher: Jay Rosman Kim

Basic lessons of the Korean language: reading, writing and speaking. This course equips students to know how to use the basic principles of the grammar and the grammatical structures. Students will have capabilities in both basic reading and conversations and also will have understanding of Korean culture.


Korean For Beginers – Part B
Credits: 4
Teacher: Ko Minjeaung

The course is taught alongside Korean for Beginners-Part A and is designed to practice and strengthen what is learned in Part A. In addition this course provides the basis of oral and written expression. The course is aimed at helping the students assimilate the knowledge acquired in both beginner level Korean courses and guide the students on how to express themselves in Korean. Upon completion of this course the students will have a strong grammatical basis and basic tools for expressing themselves in Korean.


Intermediate Korean 1
Credits: 4
Teacher: Ko Minjeaung

‘Intermediate Korean’ is designed to broaden the knowledge and tools acquired in ‘Korean for Beginners’. Students will encounter more complex grammatical issues. It consists of grammar, reading comprehension, writing and oral expression exercises. Broadening the students’ acquaintance with the modern Korean grammar, providing the ability to analyze Korean texts and enriching the students’ vocabulary.


Intermediate Korean 2: Reading Korean Texts
Credits: 4
Teacher: Ko Minjeaung

‘Intermediate Korean 2’ is designed to broaden the knowledge and tools acquired in ‘Intermediate Korean 1’. Students will learn more complex grammatical structures and expressions at intermediate level with emphasis on reading and writing ability. The primary aim of the course is to equip students with reading and writing skills. Upon successful completion of the course students will understand Korean grammar at intermediate level, be able to read different kinds of texts and compose short essays in Korean with more confidence.


Academic Reading and Writting Skills in Korean Language
Credits: 2
Teacher: Ko Minjeaung

In this course the students will be introduced to more complex texts and will learn to write essays according to these texts and the grammatical basis acquired in the language courses. Upon completion of this course, the students will not be intimidated of reading and writing in Korean and will be able to express themselves in Korean according to the grammar and vocabulary of the second year.



Spoken Korean

Credits: 2
Teacher: Ko Minjeaung

Spoken Korean is designed to expand the students’ verbal expression skills in Korean. During the class we will also practice listening comprehension. The students will be encouraged to incorporate grammatical structures in their verbal communications. Upon successful completion of the course students will be equipped with the tools needed for initiating and holding simple conversations in Korean about daily topics. The students will be able to communicate with more confidence in Korean.


Crossing Borders: Korea-Japan: Cultural Relations
Credits: 2
Teacher: Rhee Jooyeon

This is a seminar course for 3rd-year students from the Korean studies program and the Japanese program. It will offer students to learn about the political and cultural ties between Japan and Korea from pre-modern era to modern era, with an emphasis on the modern era. Japan and Korea have main roles in current East Asia which influence the world economy, politics, and defense-related issues. Their relations will be taught comparatively and historically to enhance the knowledge of their culture and society.


Historical Memory in Korean Literature and Film
Credits: 2
Teacher: Rhee Jooyeon

This course examines a body of scholalrly works, literature and films that deal with historical events of modern Korea. Korea has experienced intensely violent, yet highly dynamic social and political changes since the turn of the twentieth-century. Major historical events – such as the fall of the Confucian world order, economic and political exploitation under Japanese colonialism, the Korean War, the division between North and South Korea, the democratization movement, and the labour movement – hugely influenced the way Korean people view their own history, society and identity and the world. This course raises questions as to how certain moments of modern Korean history are remembered and contested; how the representation of cultural artifacts, literature and film shape historical memory; and how the representation can become a useful site to critique, nationalism, colonialism, national history and identity.


Religions and Culture in Korea
Credits: 2
Teacher: Uri Kaplan

It explores the unique and intriguing world of religion in Korea. It includes not only local the representation of the region’s traditions – Buddhism and Confucianism – but a wide and dynamic Shamanist movement, cults and a variety of new-religions, as well as the biggest and most active Protestant Christian movement in East Asia. This course will follow the history and philosophy of different religions in Korea at the intersections of economy, politics, education and popular culture of the Korea of today. Topics covered in this course include tourism in isolated Buddhist temples, Confucian influences on the North-Korean politics, sexual tendencies of Shamans, and Korean Christians’ love for Israel.